OK boomers—instead of being on the end of an “OK boomer” comment, now you have some ammunition. Boomers have been reported to be less of a cybersecurity vulnerability to the workforce than Gen Z. An article by Karina Zapata of CBC News outlines findings from cybersecurity tech company Check Point that posit Gen Z as a more significant cybersecurity target. Zapata quotes Jane Arnett of Check Point throughout the article on the findings, which include, “Gen Z is three times more attacked, more targeted, and they’re three times more susceptible to be breached.” The cause may be because “being chronically online hasn’t translated into healthy cyber practices for younger generations. That’s because Gen Z is generally online more, uses more apps and shares more personal information on the internet than other generations.”

Not only that, “[t]hey make easier targets in general…and they kind of don’t care.”

A Gen Z quoted in the article says she is surprised to hear that Gen Z is targeted and more prone to fall victim to online scams than boomers, which is a common misconception. She says, “I feel like Gen Z makes fun of boomers for not being safe online.”

So, Gen Z, give boomers a break on this one. They deserve it. Ratchet up your cybersecurity knowledge and safety and try to take the statistic back from the boomers.

And boomers, keep up the good work on being paranoid and protecting your data. And here’s some friendly advice of what not to say to Gen Z. Let the competition begin.

Photo of Linn Foster Freedman Linn Foster Freedman

Linn Freedman practices in data privacy and security law, cybersecurity, and complex litigation. She is a member of the Business Litigation Group and the Financial Services Cyber-Compliance Team, and chair’s the firm’s Data Privacy and Security Team. Linn focuses her practice on…

Linn Freedman practices in data privacy and security law, cybersecurity, and complex litigation. She is a member of the Business Litigation Group and the Financial Services Cyber-Compliance Team, and chair’s the firm’s Data Privacy and Security Team. Linn focuses her practice on compliance with all state and federal privacy and security laws and regulations. She counsels a range of public and private clients from industries such as construction, education, health care, insurance, manufacturing, real estate, utilities and critical infrastructure, marine and charitable organizations, on state and federal data privacy and security investigations, as well as emergency data breach response and mitigation. Linn is an Adjunct Professor of the Practice of Cybersecurity at Brown University and an Adjunct Professor of Law at Roger Williams University School of Law.  Prior to joining the firm, Linn served as assistant attorney general and deputy chief of the Civil Division of the Attorney General’s Office for the State of Rhode Island. She earned her J.D. from Loyola University School of Law and her B.A., with honors, in American Studies from Newcomb College of Tulane University. She is admitted to practice law in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Read her full rc.com bio here.