Mozilla recently released security updates to address known vulnerabilities in their Thunderbird and Firefox products. The Cybersecurity & Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) is recommending that the patches be applied because “a cyber threat actor could exploit one of these vulnerabilities to take control of an affected system.”

The updates to the Thunderbird product are designed to fix three high impact and seven medium vulnerabilities that would allow an attacker to “corrupt memory leading to a potentially exploitable crash…a bug in popup notifications delay calculation could have made it possible for an attacker to trick a user into granting permissions…a malicious devtools extension could have been used to escalate privileges,” and memory corruption “could have been exploited to run arbitrary code.”

The updates to the Firefox ESR product fix three high and seven medium impact vulnerabilities similar to those outlined above and the updates to the Firefox 122 product fixed six high and ten medium impact vulnerabilities.

All of these vulnerabilities, if exploited, could cause disruption to business units, so it would be prudent to follow the recommendations of Mozilla and CISA is prudent.

Photo of Linn Foster Freedman Linn Foster Freedman

Linn Freedman practices in data privacy and security law, cybersecurity, and complex litigation. She is a member of the Business Litigation Group and the Financial Services Cyber-Compliance Team, and chair’s the firm’s Data Privacy and Security Team. Linn focuses her practice on…

Linn Freedman practices in data privacy and security law, cybersecurity, and complex litigation. She is a member of the Business Litigation Group and the Financial Services Cyber-Compliance Team, and chair’s the firm’s Data Privacy and Security Team. Linn focuses her practice on compliance with all state and federal privacy and security laws and regulations. She counsels a range of public and private clients from industries such as construction, education, health care, insurance, manufacturing, real estate, utilities and critical infrastructure, marine and charitable organizations, on state and federal data privacy and security investigations, as well as emergency data breach response and mitigation. Linn is an Adjunct Professor of the Practice of Cybersecurity at Brown University and an Adjunct Professor of Law at Roger Williams University School of Law.  Prior to joining the firm, Linn served as assistant attorney general and deputy chief of the Civil Division of the Attorney General’s Office for the State of Rhode Island. She earned her J.D. from Loyola University School of Law and her B.A., with honors, in American Studies from Newcomb College of Tulane University. She is admitted to practice law in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Read her full rc.com bio here.